Fantasy

Children of Blood and Bone (Legacy of Orïsha #1) by Tomi Adeyemi

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Anybody who reads, who is a social reader who manages to pop their head from the pages of a book and looks online for more book news knows about this book. I was tempted to purchase it in a book fair I visited in January but the print was a little off, like that was the reason the book was at a discounted rate, and it was an authorized company booth. It was in India though so they might have just been trying to rip off poor unsuspecting readers. I left a little note to my local library and they responded by telling me that they had already put an order in due to popular demand so all I did was wait.

I finally read it last week (Yes, I am pacing my reviews to one post a day and almost all of them are scheduled posts). It was definitely worth the wait. Worldbuilding on an average is either very highly complicated or overly simplistic. Both of these characteristics work well if spun in an appropriate manner, but this one was neither. It was the medium amount of complicated. There is something called magic, it has been missing for eleven years but the possible receptors of the magic are still alive and marked by white hair so they and their friends and families are persecuted on a regular basis. That’s pretty much it. The quest on one side is to bring magic back whereas the other side wants to eradicate it and the maji forever. We have four main characters who are little more than children, shaped by their circumstances to be harder. A chance encounter between two girls sets off an epic adventure with forgotten magic becoming more obvious as does the hidden dangers of the quest.

It was simply written, and you can draw some contemporary parallels to our world, especially the situation in the US. I really enjoyed the reading and did read it in one sitting, it took more sittings than that to get this review to sound reasonable enough.

Book Depository (affiliate link)

 

6 thoughts on “Children of Blood and Bone (Legacy of Orïsha #1) by Tomi Adeyemi”

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